Lynne Rees

Lynne Rees: Featured Poet


Drawing

18” by 16”, felt tip pen on coloured paper by Ffion Richards, age 4

There is a red house with orange windows and a pink door. There is a black cat whose feet have slipped off the bottom of the page. There is a tree sprouting flowers, petals pushing against the paper’s edge, a lavender sky with a sun and a crescent moon. And floating above the roof of the house, two stick people, holding hands, unwilling to come down to earth and decide whether the sun is about to set, or if the moon will make way for dawn, or whether the cat is trying to escape or climb into the picture and run towards a door that could be closed, or might be on the point of opening.

all the times
I have been wrong
fresh paint

First published in Frogpond vol 33:3, Fall 2010

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Lynne Rees is a poet and prose writer who divides her time between Kent and Antibes, South of France. She is co-editor of Another Country, Haiku Poetry from Wales (Gomer Press 2011), runs a free online poetry workshop at:www.applehousepoetry
and blogs about food, memoir and writing at The Hungry Writer at www.lynnerees.com

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4 thoughts on “Lynne Rees: Featured Poet”

  1. Thanks to you both – Lynne and Abi – for the opportunity to read a fantastic haibun! I am very impressed how all the parts work together so well – the prose part and the haiku. And it has the wonderful feeling and imagery of a Chagall painting 🙂 AND I love how the cat is crucial to the scene. And I’m exploring your web sites, Lynne – and I’m now a follower on your blog! I’m glad to meet you.

  2. Wonderful poem Lynne – I love the stick couple ‘unwilling’ to come down to earth – thanks for letting us read it Abi 🙂

  3. Wonderful vividness. I love the questions it poses but doesn’t answer – makes me wonder about all pictures framed by their edges. Amazing last 3 lines.

  4. There’s a lovely freshness about this – I love it. It makes me think of my own children’s drawings at that age – the cat was always black. Thanks for a great read. The haiku provides a thought provoking contrast.

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