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O night divine – Jane Burn

O night divine,

bring to us a settle of wished-for snow. Bring ease
to aches, balm to wounds, calm to heads. I feel them
out there – folk who still watch the sky for Seraphims.
Hassled parents cajole their sky-high offspring to bed –
Santa is watching! They might do as they are told. Some
will get what they wanted. Some will get socks. Some
will get nothing. Someone is sleeping rough in the cold.
Each year goes quicker – January is December in less
than a blink. Superstores train us to think it’s coming
for you! bring it on! Bugger the cost. Some turn their backs
to the madness, remembering what, or who they have lost.
A Nativity of tinfoil wings. Dabbings of tears from cheeks
at the tea-towelled shepherds, lisping Magi, tinsel haloes –
Silent Night sung by Key Stage 1. Spare a thought
for Miss Crombie. She has not slept for a week. Deny
the television. There is no perfect. Heads down, eat sprouts,
survive. Love one another as much now as tomorrow –
we have been blessed with all the days that have been or are
to come. This is one, out of three hundred and sixty five –
there’s just more fairy lights, is all. Yet they are not stars.
Go out, see the real Heaven’s light unspent. Put the kettle on
and if you want to, smile. If you have enough, be grateful.
If you get the chance, be kind. Some will sleep content
and some will hold the sill and wait for dawn. Peace and hope
for better things. Yonder breaks a new and glorious morn.

..

Jane Burn’s poems have been featured in magazines such as The Rialto, Butcher’s Dog, Iota Poetry, And Other Poems, The Black Light Engine Room and many more,  as well as anthologies from the Emma Press, Beautiful Dragons, Poetry Box and Kind of a Hurricane Press. She also established the poetry site The Fat Damsel. https://thefatdamsel.wordpress.com/

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2 thoughts on “O night divine – Jane Burn”

  1. The reason this poem is so effective is because Jane manages to create together the Christmas Eve experiences of so many of us here in The Developed World – thank you, Jane.

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