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What Martin Figura is reading

 

It’s been something of a hobby horse of mine for a long time that this country’s rich variety of regional accents and language is hardly represented in our poetry. I blame the old grip of Oxford on what is the proper language for poetry. What does exist tends to be in the folk tradition (fisherman or ploughing) or northerners (self included) banging on about the Tories. But little contemporary that really celebrates the vernacular richness of our many voices.

So I fell upon this book with much anticipation and from the first line: When I became a bird, Lord, nothing could not stop me at last! the real deal, proper poetry you can read with enormous pleasure again and again. It honours the glories of the Black Country’s idiosyncratic and self-deprecatory voice with grace. Better still go and hear Liz Berry read from it and witness a room struck dumb by her quiet voice.

Further information about Martin can be seen here.
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Robert Peake on Reading at the Royal Academy

Stolen from his blog with kind permission: here

Last night I participated in a truly unique poetry reading sponsored by Ekphrasis. A dozen of us poets dispersed ourselves amongst installations in the Sensing Spaces architectural exhibit at the Royal Academy. As patrons wandered through the exhibits, we read poems to them, which we had written in response to these very spaces.

It was challenging. Bursting into poetry as the spirit moved me felt a bit like trying photo-1-300x300to be a one-man flashmob. Having never done any busking, I was unaccustomed to people wandering into or out of a room while I was reading a poem. Based on their responses, I think it was challenging, too, for the patrons. I saw many a bemused and bewildered smile.

Often, when we encounter something surprising like a provocative art installation, we seek guidance–in the placards on the walls, or the words of a knowledgeable guide. Yet we poets were the opposite of guides–raising yet more questions in response to their questions, bringing our own thoughts, music, and imagery to bear. The patrons were therefore simultaneously experiencing their own responses to the installations, and responding to ours. Challenging, indeed.

Yet challenge is not a bad thing in art; far from it. Being of service to an artistic experience, even if it is a bit personally uncomfortable to pull off, is always a privilege. To do something truly original like this is rare. We are so accustomed to the conventions of performance, so comfortable in knowing our place on either side of the “fourth wall”.

A film crew was on site to record the evening’s antics. Having individuals dressed in black point high-end videography equipment at you pretty well guarantees that people will gather in the form of an audience, and clap at the end. It is a familiar format; it tells us our roles. Yet some of the most interesting moments for me involved a more causal mix of reading, conversing, and admiring the spaces. I also managed to experience several other poets reading as well, which was fascinating, and made me feel proud to take part.

The challenge of it also brought us poets together with a sense of solidarity. For the patrons, I think it added an element of surprise. There was an atmosphere of playfulness last night that I had not experienced in my previous visit. You never knew when you might round a corner, and there would be someone reading a poem. I felt a bit like a poetry ninja.

Ekphrasis also put together a handsome anthology of the poems, which they made available to us all on the night. Hearty thanks are due, and congratulations, to Emer Gillespe and Abegail Morley for pulling this off with such grace, as well as Owen Hopkins of the RA, Kate Goodwin the curator of the Sensing Spaces exhibit, and of course the six remarkable architects who realised these installations for us all to enjoy. Here’s to more layered and provocative artistic experiences to come.

You can read all six poems I wrote in response to the Sensing Spaces exhibit, and listen to audio recordings, on my Sensing Spaces, Wandering Words page.

Robert Peake

Robert Peake is an American poet living in England. His newest short collection is The Silence Teacher (Poetry Salzburg, 2013). His previous short collection was Human Shade (Lost Horse Press, 2011).

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EKPHRASIS at the Royal Academy

Sensing Spaces: Wandering Words

sensing

Friday March 7 2014 7pm – 9pm

Seven internationally influential architects transform the main galleries of the Royal Academy of Art in London, ten poets respond to their work in an exciting evening of peripatetic poetry.

‘Imagine, feel, share, explore, touch, reflect’ – where we are shapes how we feel, what we hear colours our experience… We are delighted to announce our first event in collaboration with the Royal Academy.

The poets contributing response to Sensing Spaces are:

Patricia Debney Sasha Dugdale Ian Duhig Martin Figura Vanessa Gebbie Emer Gillespie Helen Ivory Maureen Jivani Edward Mackay Abegail Morley Robert Peake Catherine Smith Tamar Yoseloff

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Two members of the public will be invited to read as part of the evening alongside established poets. If you would like to take part, please send your work to info@ekphrasis.org.uk

Tickets for the event can be booked on the main RA website.

Sensing Spaces: Architecture Reimagined

25 January — 6 April 2014

http://www.royalacademy.org.uk/sensingspaces

WHO WE ARE

Abegail Morley, Catherine Smith and Emer Gillespie, together we share a passion for creating a dialogue between the arts.

‘It’s the exciting bit, really….how arts practitioners in one sphere can take something created by an arts practitioner in another sphere and see something fresh and inspiring in it,’ Catherine Smith

‘I find that what I see and read sets off a chain of thoughts in my own head that can lead to a poem I would never have thought of writing in the first place. The poem furthers my communication with a work of art, I can talk back to it, talk back to the artist who created it, or explore the resonance it creates inside me,’ Emer Gillespie.

EKPHRASIS provides an evening of conversation and exploration inviting collaboration with some of the most original voices working in poetry today.

Martin Figura

Martin Figura: Featured Poet

Photo: Sam Christmas

Norwich, Midnight

 

Sensing somehow earthquake or fire
creatures scurry through Mousehold Heath.
The moon snags on the cathedral’s spire
as we walk home down Magdalen Street;

through the inner ring road underpass
the piss-yellow glow of the Oxfam shop,
in whose doorway we stop and kiss
kebabs in hand, with greasy chops.

Anglia Square has never looked so beautiful
littered as she is with burger boxes.
Praise the Lord and the City Council
down from the Heath come the urban foxes.

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Martin Figura lives in Norwich with the poet Helen Ivory.  His work ranges from the bitingly funny of his Boring The Arse off Young People to the dark subject matter of his Ted Hughes Award shortlisted collection and one-man-show Whistle.   He won the 2010 Hamish Canham Prize and has performed from New York to Cromer and is an Apples & Snakes Associated Artist.   His photography’s been widely published and exhibited, including at the National Portrait Gallery.  He runs the Café Writers live literature series in Norwich and is a founder member of Norwich Poetry Club.

www.martinfigura.co.uk